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NEXT SPECIAL EVENT:

SCIENCE SHOW

19th & 20th AUGUST 2023

Museum open from March to November on select days & most Sundays.    Please check our website before visiting.

NEXT STEAMING

WEEKEND

17th & 18th JUNE

NEXT IN STEAM

JUNE

17th & 18th

Home to the giganitc steam engines that pumped London’s drinking water from 1929 to 1980.

NEXT STEAMING WEEKEND

17th & 18th JUNE

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The Engine House 

Housing the world’s largest working steam engine 

The New Engine House also known as the Triple House was built between 1926 and 1928 by William Moss & Sons of Cricklewood to contain the Metropolitan Water Board’s newest and largest steam pumping  engines.

The Engine House is made from Portland stone and red Southwater brick with a Westmoorland slate roof. The windows were originally all Crittal, but a number have been replaced with modern alternatives.

130feet x 60feet, floor is 16 feet below ground level

The building is 99feet 6inches high from the basement floor to the ridge of the lantern.

The interior walls are made from glazed bricks and majolica tiles from the dado down. The floors are lined with red encaustic quarry tiles

The Engine House 

Housing the world’s largest working steam engine 

The New Engine House also known as the Triple House was built between 1926 and 1928 by William Moss & Sons of Cricklewood to contain the Metropolitan Water Board’s newest and largest steam pumping  engines.

The Engine House is made from Portland stone and red Southwater brick with a Westmoorland slate roof. The windows were originally all Crittal, but a number have been replaced with modern alternatives.

130feet x 60feet, floor is 16 feet below ground level

The building is 99feet 6inches high from the basement floor to the ridge of the lantern.

The interior walls are made from glazed bricks and majolica tiles from the dado down. The floors are lined with red encaustic quarry tiles

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Engine House Construction

The New Engine House also known as the Triple House was built between 1926 and 1928 by William Moss & Sons of Cricklewood to contain the Metropolitan Water Board’s newest and largest steam pumping  engines.

The Engine House is made from Portland stone and red Southwater brick with a Westmoorland slate roof. The windows were originally all Crittal, but a number have been replaced with modern alternatives.

130feet x 60feet, floor is 16 feet below ground level

The building is 99feet 6inches high from the basement floor to the ridge of the lantern.

The interior walls are made from glazed bricks and majolica tiles from the dado down. The floors are lined with red encaustic quarry tiles

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BOOK TICKETS

Click here to to book tickets to see the Engine House