We’re currently experiencing mechanical issues with the Sir William Prescott engine. It’s looking unlikely we will have the engine in working order for our August steaming weekend. Please stay tuned for updates.

NEXT OPEN WEEKEND

21 & 22 AUGUST

BOOKING ESSENTIAL

We’re currently experiencing mechanical issues with the Sir William Prescott engine. It’s looking unlikely we will have the engine in working order for our August steaming weekend. Please stay tuned for updates.

NEXT OPEN WEEKEND

21 & 22 AUGUST 

BOOKING ESSENTIAL

Instrumentation

The museum features a varied collection of meters and gauges. See below for descriptions of some of the instruments on display

George Kent Venturi Meter (Mercury)

George Kent Venturi Meter (Mercury)

Water flow measurement

 

This meter records the flow of water along the 36 inch East London main to Finsbury Park. 

The instrument was made by George Kent of London & Luton. It incorporates a mercury manometer which is coupled to a Venturi tube on the water main, which enables the pressure to be measured.  The variance of pressure in the restricted part of the Venturi allows the flow to be gauged on the meter.

To record the flow a clockwork mechanism drives a drum which features a replaceable paper chart. A pen which floats on the mercury plots on the chart the pressure and flow through the water pipe.  

The mechanism requires winding every seven days.

 

 

George Kent Venturi Meter (Laleham)

George Kent Venturi Meter (Laleham)

Water flow measurement

 

The museum displays two Venturi meters that were once located at the Laleham intake on the River Thames.

Unlike the mercury manometer type, this instrument relied on a pair of floats which were supported on columns of water. The columns were supplied with water from large Venturi channels in which water from the Thames flowed. The pressure difference of the water in the Thames compared to that in the constricted part of the Venturi provided the floats with a height difference. This was then recorded on the chart. 

Three instruments were originally installed at Laleham. Two are stored at Kempton and the remainder at the London Museum of Water & Steam. 

 

British Pitometer

British Pitometer

Water flow meter

Pressure Gauges

Pressure Gauges

The museum contains scores of pressure gauges. Most work on the bourdon tube principle. The gauges measure:

Steam pressure,

Vacuum,

Compressed air pressure,

Water pressure,

Oil pressure.

Other similar designed gauges record temperature and water & steam flow.